Plitvice Lakes

Way back in the depths of January 2020, I came across a photo of Plitvice Lakes online while researching what to do in the Lika region of Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, it has attracted many keen photographers and travel journalists from across the globe – all of them unanimously agreeing that the outstanding natural beauty of Plitvice cannot be captured – with any real satisfaction – digitally. You need to see it with your own eyes was the general consensus. The very popular image that caught my attention had been taken from a high vantage point, looking down onto the upper Plitvice ledges. From this, you could see staggered lakes, almost forming steps down the side of a mountain – breaking only for the dramatic waterfalls in between. It went straight on the list of things to see in this first month away.

You’d think, that with that much lead-time and excitement about this excursion, we would have been more able to cope with a 06.45 alarm. Unfortunately, having pretty much had free reign to lazily start each day nursing coffee and reading books, this was a shock to the system. We have all retired from normal productive hours. The leisurely Dalmation lifestyle agrees with us entirely.

So with all the enthusiasm of a zombie herd from The Walking Dead, we piled into the car – (my name being taken in vain for the early hour and the insistence that we don’t cancel the day trip in favour of yet another visit to the seaside).

A two hour drive, watching the sparse, rocky coastal landscape give way to lush green forests and hills, we finally started to see signs for Plitvička Jezera.

The first thing you’ll need to know upon arriving, is what kind of route you would like to take around the lakes. The park spans miles of landscape, so doing the whole thing in one day is unrealistic. There are two entrances to the park, so you pick your route before hand and then park at the correct one for your starting point.

Map of Plitvice Lakes

We chose route H, which had us start at entrance 2 and catch the shuttle bus up to the very top of the lakes. The trail is well thought-out; board-walks winding around the best views, across the top of waterfalls and through the trees. Even when it’s overcast, the colour of the water here is incredible; a turquoise you’d expect only to see in the Maldives. It is arguably what makes these lakes so famous and is apparently due to the mountain water rushing over limestone rocks, moss and algae on it’s way down the mountains. This coats the floor of each lake with a fine white chalk, which beautifully reflects the sky on to the water.

Not known for ever doing things the easy way, we decided we wanted to see the lakes from above so deviated from the trail and hiked up into one of the surrounding mountains for a better view of the lakes from above. Dreaming of the perfect picnic spot, we rambled up through bushes and thorns until we were satisfied and could look out over the valley. Unfortunately for me, my particular route must have seen me bulldoze straight through a spider’s web because upon stopping, I found a sizable, bright orange spider clinging to my knee (picture below). Anyone who follows our Instagram account will already be aware of my arachnophobia and The Incident of the Ear Spider. So 2020 continues to harass and torture me in ever more inventive eight-legged ways.


Spiders dispatched back to the undergrowth and bakery goods consumed, we decided to keep going on our path along the top of the mountain in the hope that we’d see more beautiful aerial views of the lakes along the way. It took us about an hour of happily marching deeper into the forest to realise that we were in fact moving quite far away from the main attraction, and despite having discovered very impressive lizards on our detour, we were in real danger of spending the day ignoring what we had paid to come and see.

After a short discussion about whether the path would eventually lead back down to the lakes anyway, we decided to double back to where we had had lunch, descend to our original trail and pick up where we had left off (we discovered much later in the day, completely by accident, that at the time of this decision we were only minutes away from the viewpoint that famous image had been taken from, and but a few minutes more from a natural path leading back down to the main trail 🙄).

The path through the smaller lakes and waterfalls is truly spectacular and like something out of a fairytale. The colours are so vivid and there are hundreds of fish in even the smallest pools. For a family who loves swimming, we were initially disappointed that swimming has been banned in these lakes for a number of years now, but seeing how nature is thriving when humans are kept at a safe distance, it’s easy to see why that decision was made. It was also blissfully quiet. We had deliberately left our visit here until late September, having heard horror stories about the crowds it attracts in the summer and the misery of not having a choice but to move across the boardwalks like cattle, nose-to-nose with everyone else. Even during the height of the pandemic, tourists came in their thousands over the summer months, so we were delighted that our decision paid off – we largely had the place to ourselves.

Over approximately 10miles we ambled about, taking in the scenery and stopping for breaks when there was a quiet place to sit or an interesting beast to look at. Eventually making it to the lake at the end of our route, we decided to take another trip up into the hills before getting on the ferry which would take us back to the start. I had rough instructions I’d found online about how to access the hidden viewpoint which would give us a full unhindered look at the upper lakes from above. We climbed once again, with the kids marching ahead and Francis playing ‘Hi-Ho’ from Snow White loudly on his phone. After several false trails we finally found it, nestled in a very small rock ledge jutting out from the trees. It was every bit as beautiful as we hoped it would be; dramatic and breathtaking. I have included the photos below, though they don’t do the scene even an ounce of justice. We sat here for a long time letting it all soak in, until eventually descending back down for the final leg of our trip across Kozjak Lake to where we started.

This was a beautiful trip and I’m so glad we went. I really recommend doing it out of season and on a weekday if you can manage it. The quiet and the space really made this day magical for us – one of the real stand-out experiences of our travels so far. The kids had a fantastic time rushing about unhindered from boardwalk to boardwalk, with no one to worry about and no one to dodge.

We will definitely grab the opporutnity to go again – even with the reluctant early start!

Author: Gemma

Currently travelling Europe fulltime with kids...

3 thoughts on “Plitvice Lakes”

  1. Wow Gemma. So beautiful and memories for a life time. It’s all my daughter talked about after her trip around Europe and she promised to take me. I thought of you at work yesterday as we have a whole batch of 2nd year students with no intrapartum experience due to covid. Poor loves. Desperate for deliveries. I’m guessing that’s a million miles from your thoughts now. Still wishing I was with you tho not sure I’d manage 10 miles + hills and stuff!! Keep the beauty coming. Your comments about Izzy were so lovely. Had a little tear in my eye. Lis xxx

    Sent from my iPhone

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    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Lis ❤ This trip has been an absolute revelation for us – make sure you get your trip round Europe at some point – it's life-changing. Midwifery does seem a long way away now, but my shifts with you will always be my favourites – I miss them! Those second years are in good hands – they'll be absolute pros by the time you're finished with them! Lots of love xxx

      Liked by 1 person

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